Tag Archives: StreetSounds project

Meltin’ down age barriers in Melton: The intergenerational street band supporting family music making.

‘What I really get out of the band and the practice is simply the fun.’ says Melton resident Amy McDonald who for the past year has played with The Fabulous Meltones, one of the bands to have emerged with support from Community Music Victoria’s StreetSounds project.

There are three generations of Amy’s family in the band: Amy, her 67 year old father, Martin, and her three kids, Nina, Tenzin and Kohana who range in age from 23-6 years old.

“To have the sort of fun that say, Havana Palava have, would’ve been undreamed of for me before, and even though I’m not there yet, I live in hope!”

The experience of being in The Fabulous Meltones has extended the opportunity Amy and her family has to make music together, and brought unexpected and hidden talents to light.

“My father who has done orchard work most of his life learnt to make feathered headdresses for the Dream Big festival, last year. Local artist Krissy Tee, who is currently specialising in the creation of amazing headdresses came to give us all a lesson. Dad made his in record time and was then able to help everyone else. He’s also getting to grips with the finer points of picking out loud shirts (The Fabulous Meltones signature colours are red, orange, pink and yellow because we are Melton…meltin’ hot..”

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Martin models his meltin’ hot headdress

Since their inception last year, The Fabulous Meltones have wasted no time making their mark on the local music scene. Lead by John Lane, they have performed at the Dream Big Festival as well as the Platypus and Djerriwarhh festivals in Melton. They’ve also played at the Melton train station for the opening of the underpass artwork unveiling; as part of At The Platform and at the end of year wrap-up party for Linking Melton South.

“I love that we get to perform together, we had never done anything like that together before. My dad always played the guitar, and my mum did and my grandfather does. I had trouble learning written music so I just learnt one riff from every person I came across. Mostly we know that when we’re together we’ll try and have a jam of some sort because everyone’s grown up and moved away, and my dad really loves it.”

The fact that four of the band members are family is important to Amy. “There’s such a difference between the styles of music that each generation likes. When you have family songs that everyone loves singing and those songs remind you of good times that you’ve had, this is a plus because they cross the generation gap.”

Amy and her family practice the pieces they’re learning with the band, together at home.

“I hear my little one, she seems to be singing the songs all the time at home but she will never perform… she sits and draws and she won’t join in, but she’s still listening.”

Amy is adamant that there shouldn’t be any division in society based on age and that being part of The Fabulous Meltones offers people the opportunity to mix socially outside of their own age group and that this teaches tolerance, patience and respect.

“Old people shouldn’t be excluded and young people certainly shouldn’t be excluded…Young people think they’re cool and that we don’t understand their music, but all music becomes old and daggy and it’s only a matter of time until it comes back into fashion.”

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Amy and her daughter, two of the Meltones gals

The fact that there are people of all ages involved in The Fabulous Meltones keeps things interesting and encourages people to be aware and thoughtful of the needs of others.

“Everyone has to be patient… there are little kids there and you have to be patient with older people too… while some people learn things quickly, other people need to be shown things a few times. We’re all different… John (Lane)’s really great and has taught a few of the band members to play the ukulele from scratch, which is so valuable.”

It’s recognised that involvement in an intergenerational community band promotes connection, communication and friendship between the participants, and the benefits of this have a positive effect extending beyond the context of the music making,  strengthening  and reinforcing the fabric of the community.

As Amy says of her experience as a Fabulous Meltone, “It makes you satisfied with your life and with being where you are….”

Article by Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria and Amy McDonald from The Fabulous Meltones.

**If you’re interested in joining The Fabulous Meltones, the next practice will be on Thursday 2nd March, at 4.30pm. The band is open to everyone (any age, instrument and skill level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Dunroamin? Just startin! A hot stepping new street band hits the streets of Dunolly

Picture the scene: a large group of leather clad bikers on a pit stop; add a healthy dose of community musicians into the mix, and what do you get? Broadway, a street through the small, regional town of Dunolly, last Saturday afternoon.

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A scene from Broadway, Dunolly

The latest addition to the CMVic StreetSounds project shook its collective feathers and stepped blinking into the light at 2pm last Saturday as the new and perfectly formed Dunolly Street Band. Emerging from the Ministry of Fun after less than two hours playing together, the fledgling band wasted no time in taking their newly learnt tunes into the street, where the bikers proved an enthusiastic audience for the horns, ukes, flute and accordion players.

Anna and Phil Ashton who organised the afternoon in collaboration with StreetSounds project manager, Lyndal Chambers, declared it it loads of fun and a total success.

“It was nicely low key and I don’t think anybody was scared!”

Anna was inspired to start a Street band in Dunolly after hearing about the opportunities offered by other bands emerging from the project, particularly the Kyneton Street Band, led by Andy Rigby, but still more than an hour’s drive from Dunolly. For Anna and Phil,

“It didn’t make sense to be part of a street band anywhere else.”

The last community brass band in the town finished up about fifteen years ago. A Ukulele group formed a couple of months ago, but for players of more honky and stronger sounding instruments, an opportunity to gather regularly has been a long time coming. Once she knew support from Lyndal Chambers and Community Music Victoria’s StreetSounds* project would support her vision of a Street Band for Dunolly, Anna felt the idea was too good to pass up and set the wheels in motion, posting publicity within the community and on Facebook. A street band is a fantastic way to bring together local people from all age groups and backgrounds, playing different types of instruments in different ways; a wonderful smorgasbord of sounds and skills.

As the promotional poster for Dunolly Street Band promised, ‘absolutely no experience needed, just come and play for fun.’

Anna admits she felt a bit nervous about numbers ahead of the gathering on Saturday. Strat (Brian Strating) and Lyndal were travelling up from Gippsland to help facilitate and Anna wanted them to have a good ole group to lead when they arrived. She needn’t have worried. Keen community musos travelled from the other side of Newstead and Bendigo to join local Dunollians, including a musician fairly new to the area which is what it’s all about, after all.  Anna knows other people are out there and keen for the band to happen, who simply couldn’t make it along last Saturday.

Following this hugely successful inaugural get together, there are plans to carry the band forwards into a bright (and brassy) future, and working together with Phil’s uke group. Anna is also hoping to encourage local school kids and their families to try it, too.

By the time the StreetSounds festival rolls around next May, it sounds like there will be a thriving Dunolly contingent out in the throng on the streets of Geelong.

And what happened to the bikers? They gave the new Dunolly Street Band an encouraging round of applause before heading off through the Central Goldfields, chasing the dissipating, freed-up notes of newly learnt tunes as they dispersed into the atmosphere.

Below is a video clip of the band in action, out on Broadway. (Thanks to band member Judy Meldrum for the footage)

Article by Deb Carveth with Anna Ashton

Join the Dunolly Street Band! The band is in the process of arranging its next rehearsal. To be a part of it, contact Anna and Phil: 0490 077 902

*StreetSounds is a major project that resulted from the Victoria Makes Music Program and started in January 2015 with the help of funding from the Helen Macpherson Smith Trust and the R E Ross Trust.  The project aims to create at least 10 new street bands in Victoria and will run until Dec 2017 – find out more about StreetSounds here.

 

 

Basking in the freewheelin’ warmth of the Sunshine Street Band

The last rays of a Tuesday evening sun can often be glimpsed glinting off the brass horns,  drums and other instruments of the Sunshine Street Band by the runners and dog walkers soaking up day’s end on Albion’s oval.

Every second week, the band throw open the doors of Albion Community House to allow strains of ska, jazz, whatever they’re currently playing to escape into the evening air and across this little patch of Melbourne’s West.

Peter Hinton, band founder and self professed freewheeling trombone player, sees the Sunshine Band as a ‘perfect gateway into playing in a group where different instruments are represented.’ Players of any acoustic instrument are welcome, with age and a lack of experience no barriers to joining. Some people follow dots, others play by ear.

As one of the inaugural bands in the StreetSounds project run by Community Music Victoria, the Sunshine Street Band is a real collective and has evolved to run as a collaborative model after a large dose of input, encouragement and mentoring in the early stages, from Lyndal Chambers, guest tutor Robert Jackson, Brian Strating and Katie Rose Fowler, who still plays with the band.

Peter considers the band an effective way to combat social isolation and improve connectedness between like minded people living in and around Sunshine: ‘It’s a very healthy thing to have a connection with your community..’

Hinton was the catalyst in getting the band started because he was keen to find somewhere for himself and his family – specifically his teenage daughter, to play music together with others and because there was ‘genuinely nothing else like that around where you could play music for the joy of it, where auditions and an expected level of experience didn’t apply..’

With some musical experience playing guitar with friends who then moved across town, Peter was keen for himself and his daughter to have the freedom to try new instruments and keep music going as an ‘outside of school type of thing’.  After a spot of googling, and deciding that a local community band open to beginners would be the most rewarding thing to be part of, Peter discovered Community Music Victoria and picked up the phone.

His timing was perfect. Funding for StreetSounds had just been granted by the Helen MacPherson Smith Trust and the RE Ross Trust, and Lyndal Chambers was in place as project manager. Peter’s passion and palpable conviction of the need for a community band in Sunshine were the perfect sparks to ignite the project, and the Sunshine Street band, and the project, were launched.

 ‘Without Lyndal, this wouldn’t have started… she had all the contacts… Together with Strat she helped set the culture in the first couple of sessions .. they made it clear that you don’t have to be professional to be in a band, there were no wrong notes! It was all motivation and encouragement. And she found us the room too. (thanks to Brimbank Council).’

The band is evolving into a real collective in the way they choose what to play and the way they play it. ‘Katie knows which instruments play in which key which has really helped cos you need somebody like that… and we’ve found there are heaps of good reasons for all sharing the leader role, everyone has a say and when they have a say they feel more involved and connected. It also feels more sustainable and means that all the pressure isn’t just on one person.’

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Sunshine Street Band skills being put into practice at CMVic’s 2015 Music Camp

As the numbers increase, Peter says people are being drawn to the community vibe of the band. ‘There are some strong players coming in now from Sunshine West way, and you can tell from the way they play they like their music.’

As a band open to players of all abilities and musical tastes, Peter believes the key to participants getting the most enjoyment out of belonging to the Sunshine Street Band is to be open to trying different styles of music, be supportive of each other and ‘don’t expect too much, too fast… you have to make the commitment.’

From a personal perspective, Peter says that ‘being in the band and playing a brass instrument has opened up a new world for me… I’ve never done something like this before… It’s loosened up some inhibitions in me, you can feel constrained trying to play by the book and I was feeling musically detached, playing a bit of guitar but not socially, so being in the band is really important.’

The door to the Albion Community Centre is open for the duration of the band’s rehearsals every second Tuesday, and newcomers from absolute beginners to experienced players are always welcome: Drop in and try it out!

The Sunshine Street Band: Meets fortnightly at Albion Community House, 61a Selwyn St, Albion, VIC 3020 For dates and further information, go to www.cmvic.org.au

Article by Deb Carveth with Peter Hinton; feature photograph courtesy of Angela Casella