Tag Archives: online community

Sing out and take a stand against domestic violence

White ribbon

Back in April, an invitation was sent to community choirs to unite and sing up at a ‘pioneering choral event’ called You’re the Voice, an element of the 2017 Queensland Music Festival dedicated to highlighting the persistent problem of domestic violence across Australia and building awareness in a bid to ‘turn the tide’ and support positive change.

youre_the_voice
image from Queensland Music Festival 2017

The project, directed by Dr Jonathan Welch, has received high profile support* from singers including Archie Roach, Kate Ceberano, and Katie Noonan, who is also the festival’s artistic director.

On July 29, 2500 community singers participating in You’re the Voice will congregate in Brisbane, joined by other community choirs and singing groups from around the country via live stream and social media, to deliver their powerful message, singing John Farnham’s song of the same name.

Closer to home and in response to news of the project, Vivienne Colegrove, a singer songwriter from the community music network here in Victoria got in touch, offering to share a song she had written about domestic violence with any other community singing groups and choirs wishing to address the issue, also:

Hi CMVic folk,
following on from your post on FB re Katie Noonan’s call for choirs to sing out against domestic violence, I have a song that I am happy for choirs to use if they wish (just to acknowledge me as the composer obviously!) Here is a (strictly rehearsal-only quality) mp3 recording and pdf score for choir facilitators – please feel free to pass on to anyone who may wish to use it. Free to a good home!
Warm regards – Vivienne Colegrove

‘White Ribbon Anthem’ by Vivienne Colegrove

It’s time to sing out it’s time to speak out
It’s time to shout out we’re making change
We stand together we stand united
It’s time to sing out we’re making change

No more silence about the violence
No more looking the other way
Join our chorus Sing together
Sing as one voice we’re making change

Safe for women safe for children
Safe for men of any age
Safe for my mother safe for my brother
Safe for each other let’s turn the page

(chorus)

Make it change now we’re making change now
Change is what we say and do
Let’s make change now let’s do change right now
Change is me and change is you

(chorus) x 2

Vivienne says “I was inspired to write this song because I feel excited about the power of singing together as a community to bring about the positive changes we want in our world. Music, and especially singing, is such an inspiring, unifying way to invite transformation and change. I have a vision of hundreds, thousands of voices lifted together in song as a heartfelt invitation to create a safe world together for us all.”

Vivienne’s words echo those of Katie Noonan who, when speaking of the potentially transformative power of You’re the Voice said,  “We can sing together for those whose voices have been silenced by fear… I believe that art and music have the power for significant change and that musicians and art have a responsibility to respond to, and reflect on, our society and the things we can do to create change.”

Written by Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria with massive thanks to Vivienne Colegrove.

Download the lyrics to White Ribbon here & the mp3 of White Ribbon here 

*Archie Roach, Troy Cassar-Daley, Montaigne, Katie Noonan, Kate Ceberano and Isaiah  have collaborated to re-record ‘You’re the Voice’ as a charity single to raise funds to support young people who are victims of domestic violence. To purchase the single, click here. (All proceeds will be donated to DVConnect.)

References:

Support Services for anyone living with Domestic and Family abuse:

 

A conversation about leading singers with ASD

This post is not written from a professional perspective. It is the shared experiences of Liz, a mother who is also a singing leader, who has a son with ASD and who was generous enough to share her observations and knowledge.

Autism spectrum disorder,  (ASD) is the term used to describe a group of disorders in brain development that includes autism, Asperger’s syndrome and pervasive developmental disorder (also known as atypical autism).  The word ‘spectrum’ is used to reflect the range and varying degrees in the severity levels of symptoms found in individuals with ASD. These typically present as difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication, and repetitive behaviours, to varying degrees. Autism is the most commonly occurring form of ASD.

Any group of people coming together for an activity will comprise a glorious melting pot of personalities, stories, challenges and needs, many of which are neither visible nor immediately apparent at first glance.

Many of the tips and strategies outlined below are unlikely to be entirely new to many experienced leaders,  but it’s always good to be reminded of them.

Liz feels “we don’t need to ‘specialise’ or become experts to lead a positive singing experience for someone with ASD.” To varying degrees with autism, sensitivities are more magnified and social behaviour that is unconsciously expected in our society does not come naturally.

One of the great things that I have learnt from my experience with my son is to look more closely at each individual’s perspective and story, rather than the more collective, often unquestioned, expectations of our society.”

However, there are many practical approaches you can easily incorporate into your practice as a music group leader that will help increase the pleasure of participation for a person with ASD, and put everyone at ease within the group, too.

For Liz, whose son has high functioning Asperger’s, the initial challenge in encouraging him to sing was to find a group open to all ages that welcomed the two of them at a time of the day suitable for them both. This pursuit led to Liz hearing about Community Music Victoria and attending a Gippsland Singers Network weekend at Wilson’s Prom. It was there she was first introduced to the fully inclusive concept of Vocal Nosh. It felt a perfect fit for both Liz and her son. That weekend, as always, the Vocal Nosh model was open, it was relaxed and there were no rules to be followed or broken. This created an immediate sense of ease, and if Liz’s son didn’t want to sing a particular song then he could opt out, and join back in for the next one.

“It’s awesome to be able to provide an activity that reduces the anxiety of restriction that is common with the experience of living on the spectrum.

My son enjoys a Vocal Nosh because he doesn’t have to stand anywhere in particular, he is singing with me and I’m having fun and is relaxed and so he reflects this.”

Full of inspiration, Liz returned home and decided to set up a singing group of her own, run along the lines of a Vocal Nosh and open to singers of all ages and abilities, with support from CMVic mentors and catalysts Margaret Crichton and Kass Mulvany.

As well as Liz’s son, a second young person with ASD joined the group. Liz found that having a relaxed approach was key, and also that it was essential not to take offence if somebody turned around and said ‘I don’t like that song’.

Emotion recognition needs to be learnt by a person with ASD. ASD causes difficulty in decoding nuances or facial expressions and the unspoken rules in life – of which there are so many – don’t apply to somebody with ASD in the same way. This can make others around them feel ill at ease if something is said in an overly blunt way, something which can be challenging in a group context.

Liz recommends ‘Don’t be offended by pickiness or bluntness. Keep an open mind and continue to learn about the human condition. Lead by example to the rest of the group by reacting to any bluntness directed your way with a relaxed attitude, and go with the flow.

For example, some people may find it uncomfortable if the unspoken gets said. A person might say they are bored or that a particular song is boring, causing other people to feel horrified that this sentiment was verbalised.  And then there’s that awkward silence that ensues…

Liz also recommends that singing leaders take particular care to be clear with their instructions and their signals when teaching a song.

“Sometimes these won’t be understood by a person with ASD, so explain first what your hand signals mean.”

Many people with ASD will find socialising an anxiety provoking activity because of the literalness with which they interpret situations and coding around them. A wink for example, doesn’t convey a double meaning or cheeky intent, it means ‘that person has something in their eye.’

This heightened sense of anxiety should always be considered and Liz also recommends that changes to a routine are best avoided or made slowly when considering the needs of someone with ASD. For this reason, it is important to say to everyone ‘you are so welcome here’ and emphasise the point that they can do whatever they need to, in order to be comfortable.

“I tell them, if you want to sit down, that’s fine..sit down and sing if it works.”

Once a person with ASD feels familiar with a setting and with other members of the group, everything is usually fine.

One conversation Liz always avoids is the one which starts, “this is so and so and they have autism… you just can’t do that.“  Instead, an exercise she feels may help leaders before a session, is to think up some positive ways to respond to some of the typical situations that may arise.

 “Let’s face it, life’s amazing and wonderful tapestry of personalities can bring challenges in facilitating any singing/music group, so this will not be a new strategy.”

Liz’s son gets a lot of comfort from music and a lot of fun too. Liz believes that getting autistic kids involved in music from an early age trains their brains to react to dopamine in a positive way, boosting their mood and sense of worth, as it does for us all. For adults with ASD who enjoy participatory music making, it can be particularly beneficial. Belonging to a singing group can help prevent any feelings of social isolation which may occur as the result of difficulty in easily maintaining stable social connections.

“If you meet the brain’s demands for dopamine with a healthy thing, then you don’t need to meet that demand with an unhealthy thing… Let’s get the whole world singing.”

Advice for group leaders working with people with ASD, based on Liz’s experience and observations:

  • Be clear with your directions
  • Be welcoming
  • Be sensitive to whether somebody has struggled to be present in the group on that day and whether they’re feeling uncomfortable or awkward
  • Tread carefully with body contact in warm ups or particular songs, depending on the person
  • Be prepared for bluntness and don’t be offended by it, and absorb it on behalf of the other group members
  • If you’re going to change something in the process or course of the group, explain those changes clearly and give advance warning that the changes will happen, where possible the week before. Send a message to the person it will affect most, ahead of time
  • Be aware that for some people with ASD, participation in your group may be their only experience of trying something social and you want it to be positive!
  • And finally, expect the unexpected.

For further information and to access advice about Autism Spectrum Disorder, visit AMAZE: www.amaze.org.au 

1: Australian Psychology Society: Understanding and managing Autism Spectrum Disorder

2: Autism Speaks: What is autism?

Article written by Deb Carveth with Liz  for Community Music Victoria

 

Pollyphonics 6 min documentary – The start of a great musical journey

Give people an opportunity to feel good - Polly Christie, Pollyphonics Choir Leader

Polly has shared this video on our CMVic facebook page and we thought it was a fantastic example of how powerful music can be in connecting with others.  Runs for 6 minutes and offers a great insight into the many benefits of community music from both a leader’s and participant’s perspectives.

Here’s a little of what’s covered.

  • Deciding to become a leader
  • Where to start a group
  • Objectives
  • Fee structure
  • Going from being the conductor, facilitator, coordinator to introducing section leaders
  • Challenges

Here’s what the choir participants had to say

I got my mojo back

When I come here I know that I’ll feel so much better

It’s the start of a great musical journey

This link will take you to the video:  Pollyphonics Choir documentary Sep 2014

Documentary created by Rebecca Fitzgibbon for her music course at Northern Melbourne, Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia.

The Pollyphonics Choir is located in Woodend, Victoria Australia
Website: www.pollychristie.com
Facebook:  facebook.com/PollyphonicsChoir

Article by CMVic Team

Helping a Singer Match Pitches: Handy Hints for the Teacher

Sing It - CMVic Publication - Cover PageAn article from Sing It – A quarterly publication created by Community Music Victoria. 
To download your FREE online copy visit our website: https://cmvic.org.au/resources/newsletters
To purchase a hardcopy for $12 AU ($10 AU for CMVic Members) visit our store: https://cmvic.org.au/resources/store

Most people can learn to match pitches if helped constructively. Some may need more assistance and experimentation than others. I don’t accept that there is a condition in some people of ‘tone deafness’, although where there is a physical injury to voice or hearing apparatus, it may not be possible to match pitches.

  1. Singing in a large group may help, but can also mask the problem or limit the singer to particular tunes or a particular group.
  2. I have discovered or learnt various things that will help the teacher who is helping a singer to match pitches (sometimes referred to as ‘singing in tune’). I would welcome feedback on these:
  3. Work with student/singer alone. Avoid group situations where family or peers act as an audience
  4. Work with a recording device if the student feels comfortable with this. They often discover extra ideas from listening to it later.
  5. Many will know this one. Experiment with slides, hoots, yells, growls, etc. Play with the sounds. There is no right or wrong in this exercise. Avoid the words ‘right’ and ‘wrong’ – use ‘comfortable’, ‘uncomfortable’, ‘matching’ as appropriate.
  6.  At first, the teacher can try matching pitches with the student rather than the other way around. If you don’t have the same registers (e.g. other sex) use an instrument to match the student’s pitches (piano is best even if you don’t play). This shows the student how ‘matching pitches’ feels. Later, get the student to match pitches with the teacher.
  7. •Once the student has started to match pitches with the teacher, find out which notes or area of notes (low, middle, high) they feel most comfortable with. Most recently I have worked with female students whose range focuses between middle C and F below it. (Later, in two cases, we have explored up to an octave in range).
  8. See if the student can distinguish between low and high areas of her/his own voice. There are tests but you can just ask the student to make what they hear as high or low notes in their own voice. (Men are usually weaker on this point).
  9. Extend the range gradually, using three or five note runs. It will also help if you can find songs in the student style of preference, first songs in their comfortable pitch area and later others.
  10. If the student is almost matching pitches but not quite, encourage them to slide their voices around in a small way until they match. Whatever method that helps is OK.
  11. Get the student to make positive affirmations about their voice (e.g.‘I am now discovering new areas of my voice’). The student rather than the teacher needs to do this, though the teacher may guide.
  12. Often people who sing off key are quick to pick up on technique.
    I have developed an abridged and adapted version of (classical)
    technique, which works well for beginning singers in all styles,
    especially relaxing the throat. Student’s confidence can increase
    quite a bit on this point, even if they are struggling to match specific pitches.

Further reading: Judy, Stephanie Making Music for The Joy Of It Wigglesworth, Leigh Post Graduate thesis on types of out-of –tune singers.

Article by Jill Scurfield
Singing Leader

What do we want a Blog for, anyway?

Why blog?For ages, we eschewed social media at CMVic. We were almost afraid it would alienate us from each other; that we would sit at home screen gazing in increased isolation and forsake hooking up to make music. Because we prefer not to rush, but to relish things slowly in life (read funding shortfall, folks) the reality dawned on us only gradually that there was a whole online community thing happening under our very noses that wasn’t going away any time soon, which we’d be bonkers to let pass us by and that contrary to our initial perception, heaps of goodness, connectivity, and learning was coming from it.

Having accepted that this phenomenon had potential to be a great tool and not the cruel master we’d once feared, CMVic moved to embrace social media. Actually, ‘embrace’ might be slightly emphatic, it was more of a luke warm hug to begin with (even my grandparents beat CMVic to starting a Facebook page) but then another amazing realisation occurred: In terms of developing networks, communicating and resource sharing, the social media landscape in some ways, is an online echo of the very essence that drives us.

Hang on to your hats, world! Having gained momentum we quickly found our feet, collecting account names and logins all over the place to YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter among others and now, finally, we are blogging. We’ve propelled ourselves into the blogosphere, such a great word and synonymous – to me anyway – with the sound and feel of walking in wellies through mud.

Working as we do to promote and facilitate connections through music making, we have dreams that our blog will enable us to extend the CMVic network beyond Victoria, beyond Australia to a worldwide community of music makers, leaders and activists, and help us to promote the uniqueness of what we do here in our home state, as leaders, pioneers and supporters in the field of community music.

To connect with an audience of bloggers and followers who are like-minded people, to read and share their articles and to hear of their projects, philosophies and dreams for sustaining and growing the future of music making, whether they’re from just around the corner or somewhere around the globe is a magical and empowering thing. The CMVic blog is our glass against the wall to listen in to what’s going on out there, and it’s our tin can on a piece of string for telling everyone all of the great things that we do and what we’re all about.

Deb Carveth
Online Editor Aug 2014