Tag Archives: Music Groups

Rhythms & Beats Drum up Community Connection in Hurstbridge

When Annie Fletcher and her family moved back from WA to Melbourne, Hurstbridge seemed a nice spot at the end of the train line. It wasn’t until they’d been living there a few months that Annie realised the rich arts community they’d been fortunate to move into.

Keen to get into more hand-drumming, Annie decided to hook into the local scene, in particular the regular jamming sessions at St Andrew’s market, which at that time had a weekly drum circle. This lead to a conversation with the local neighbourhood house about starting a beginners group and, fourteen years later as Drum Connection, the beat goes on.

“I wasn’t a particularly experienced drummer at that time but, because I’d been a teacher for many years, I used my teaching skills to work out what I wanted to teach and how and it just grew from there. My intrinsic love of rhythm had also been honed over many years with my passion and tertiary study in Dance.”

Numbers were low to start with, but running the group gave Annie an opportunity to assimilate into the community, “it helped me find my place and it was just so rewarding”.

Participation in the new group continued to grow with spots of natural fluctuation, but the community music experience continued as a weekly dose of positive good fun.

“I always say there are no mistakes in the drumming, there are just variations on a theme and a bit of jamming is fine. People like that and if they struggle with a particular rhythm, they can just play the first beat of each bar or the main beats of the rhythm and when the finishing call comes, they can whack the drum again and finish with the group, so it’s accessible to all.”

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Keeping the beat at a Drum Connection workshop

Annie has found that some drummers just keep coming back while others take time out and return after an extended break. Consequently, a consistent core has developed with several drummers having earned themselves a Drum Connection ‘10 Year badge’!

“Over the years we’ve built up a community which is really very special and the group always welcomes and nurtures whoever walks through that door.”

Drum Connnection participants vary widely in age, ranging from a few older school-aged kids through to seniors. Everyone jollies each other along, learning, nurturing and playing as a collective group. Annie runs two long sessions, one on Thursday evenings and one on Friday afternoons. Within these sessions, levels 1, 2 and 3 are covered in particular time slots, which allows specific groups to learn layers of the shared rhythms at a complexity appropriate to them.

Drummers are offered an opportunity to perform at community events and when this occurs all of the different drum voices are combined within a structure for the whole rhythm, so that the entire group can play as one ensemble.

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Drum Connection’s senior Dun ensemble

Annie also likes to introduce a singing element into her workshops, when simple parts of traditional songs can be taught to accompany an appropriate rhythm. Annie saves this ‘surprise’ until around week 3 by which time anyone new has settled in. “I’ve had people say to me, ‘oh you’ll never get me singing but of course, in time, they all sing!”

Occasionally, people will express concern that they lack enough rhythm to join in, and some people certainly find drumming a bit trickier than they expect to, but Annie has found that when she can assist them to relax, the drumming falls into place more easily. A number of drummers come to Drum Connection as part of a personal recovery process. For people who have suffered some sort of trauma, loss, bereavement, separation, anxiety or illness it can be of assistance when they are at a transition phase in their lives. “Often people will say to me afterwards, “that was just the best thing”.

“Some people find they can actually switch off from the big thing in their life because they are concentrating so hard on drumming, others find they can go into this quite meditative state and those people might have one or two rhythms you can see really working for that person and they totally zone out.”

Annie believes it’s unnecessary to highlight the healing or meditative aspects of drumming for discussion in the context of these community classes, preferring to consider these positive outcomes as an added bonus of the experience of participation and rhythms in a shared music-making context:

“People will discover this for themselves, it doesn’t have to be labelled… it can still be having this effect for many people whilst other people are just enjoying the music or the social aspect. Drumming can be different things to different people and we don’t necessarily need to put a label on any of those.”

Kids have joined in with Drum Connection workshops over the years, usually accompanying a parent although not always: “Anyone over the age of around 10 is welcome. I have occasionally had someone as young as 7 and although it’s an adult class there’s no problem them joining in if it works for them. It can be a nice thing for a parent and child to do.”

This month Annie is starting a series of drumming workshops in Hurstbridge specifically for kids, to gauge interest and uptake. “There are some good music programs in the local primary schools but for any kids who can’t get in or are too young, it could offer a good transition… I’ll give it a go and see!”

Article by Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria, with Annie Fletcher 

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If you would like any more information about these classes or single workshops for specific groups, contact Annie: Mob: 0407 102 578; Email: annie@drumconnection.com.au;  
fb: Drum Connection Aus

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ideas for Community Music Group Leaders, from Belinda McArdle

150812singingldrshipSeveral community music makers and group leaders gathered at Commonground for peer exchange last weekend. I arrived late and left early and am in no position to summarise the weekend but I write to contribute to the network the ideas that captured my attention while there, in the hope they may be useful to others.

Having facilitated many CMVic weekends over the last ten years it was refreshing to be a participant and to be so warmly welcomed, encouraged, supported, inspired, challenged and heard.

It was wonderful to step away from my own busy life to engage in the wider discussion of values and music making even if only for 5 hours. I left with soup in my being, songs recorded on my phone, a copy of Jane Coker’s fabulous new resource ‘Just Sing’, some plans to song swap on line, fabulous group exercises and warm ups and some hearty food for thought.

The afternoon workshop, mutually devised and well facilitated by Strat and Aaron, challenged us to check in with our values and the notion of inclusivity.

Various exercises drew out philosophical arguments, practical tips and everything in between.

I summarise here what I remember, having handed in my notes to CMVic. The topic was what can we as music making leaders/an organisation keep doing, stop doing and start doing in relation to inclusivity.

include in our leadership our own passion for music making. We may think this is implicit, but all of a sudden notice we have been putting admin before playing, we have been playing it safe in our leadership and not taking risks or simply not playing enough ourselves. So, my ideas and resolutions on this topic are:

  • to ensure I am singing and playing for fun outside of my leadership
  • try some more impro games
  • keep including my own original material as well as a courageous cross section and allow my excitement to grow and be shared

Implicitly and explicitly create a culture of belonging. We value welcoming people to our groups and we discussed the value of every member feeling they are a welcomer and part of the hospitality. We discussed allowing people to opportunity to leave or to feed back when a group isn’t the right vibe for them. We talked about remembering to speak openly about WHY we are welcoming from time to time and we touched on feeling we belong ourselves. So, my take on this for my own practise is:

  • to continue to welcome newcomers individually and ask them to share with me after how welcome they felt
  • to continue to foster a culture of belonging by asking people to welcome people around them at the start of the session
  • ensure I feel included by sharing with the group that I would prefer not to leave alone in the dark at nights and ask them to share staying back with me.

Of course the discussion was richer and broader but they were my standard tips personally. Other big and little resolutions I took away were:

  • I purchased a copy of Search and Reflect by John Stevens based on the workshop Jane Coker delivered
  • I will be gathering my group at start/after session with either a hum or a clapping exercises
  • I used to ask participants to bring their instrument on last week of term and then run 3 chord song so it was accessible and interesting in a different way. I need to start that again.
  • Go to more CMVic events
  • Use the microphone in Facebook Messenger to send little voice files to other leaders and receive them back.
  • Contribute more to the blog/wider discussion so I can hear what others are doing and be reminded of our very important differences that keep us interesting.

I enjoy sharing what I have and know and think and am open to emails from other leaders and the exchange of ideas, songs and challenges. Conctact: Belinda@acabellas.net.au http://www.acabellas.net.au

Belinda McArdle

Jigarre Jammin’ – a musical phenomenon

by Gwen Potter

JigarreMusicians2 (1)Jigarre Jammin’ Our motto: Don’t die wishing you’d done it! Jigarre Jammin’ is a musical phenomenon! Up to 70 community-based musicians meet at Girgarre every month for up to five hours of playing, singing, sharing knowledge, catching up – and they love every minute of it! Girgarre is a tiny but very important dairying centre of fewer than 200 residents, located midway between Echuca and Shepparton.

Musos of all ages and stages come from everywhere in northern and central Victoria. Some older players have waited for years to learn; others have never stopped and generously share their skills. Everyone joins in with an enthusiasm and regularity that must be unique in country Victoria.

JJ began when a small bunch of players found the annual Girgarre Moosic Musters were not enough – they needed more sessions to keep them going month to month. A winning format was devised back then which is still followed – in fact, it’s been expanded due to demand. We meet on the 4th Saturday at the Girgarre Town Hall in Winter Road. The format goes something like this:

  • 10.30am: A Celtic jam for all the lovers of Irish and Scottish music
  • 11.30am: A jam for all the fans of Australian bush music
  • 12.30pm: BYO lunch in the supper room
  • 1.30pm: Jigarre Jammin’
  • Arrival, tune up and jam for about 35 minutes, with leaders introducing some new songs
  • Welcome and announcements
  • Workshops for beginners or join in another jam
  • Afternoon tea (country-style – it’s huge)
  • Walk-ups (only if you want to perform)
  • Final jam to take us to a 4pm close.

Styles played cover country, folk, blues, bluegrass, traditional Aussie bush numbers, Celtic, golden-oldies pop, gospel and contemporary. Instruments include guitar, ukes (lots), banjo, mandolin, bass, harmonica, and violin.JigarreJamming1 If you don’t want/need a workshop, you can continue jamming or find a corner with your mates and practise a walk-up number. A number of musos have found kindred souls and formed bands of their own from this process.

Jamming our way It’s important to define “jamming” the way we do it – we make it really easy by putting both lyrics and chords up on a screen via data projector. That way everyone can join in, regardless of expertise or familiarity with the song.

Free instrument loans Want to experiment or try before you buy? Use our free instrument bank – guitars, mandos, ukes, even a banjo or two. Thanks to donations from Fender and other supporters, we have lots to offer.

The cost of all this is a mere $2 per person, and a plate, no membership or subscriptions involved.

And there’s more! Musical camp-overs twice a year, held around a Jigarre Jammin’ weekend!  The first camp-over in 2012 was a total success. Tents and caravans on the reserve next to Girgarre Town Hall, music Friday to Sunday, happy hours, communal meals if you wanted and everyone getting to know each other better as we played on into the night. The May 2015 campover featured a concert with a lineup of bands that are connected to Jigarre Jammin’ in some way and was a great success.

Save the date! Soon planning will begin for the 10th anniversary of the Girgarre Moosic Muster in early January 2016 – check out our website We’ve emphasised playing music in this article but the Muster contains heaps of workshops and opportunities for non-playing singers. JigarreJammin4

Some secrets of our success: Our organising team, led by real community-action dynamos, Jan Smith of Girgarre and Di Burgmann of Shepparton, have long histories of involvement with our communities and helping to bring opportunities to people. We are devoted to acoustic music and devoted especially to encouraging beginners. We often see that musos find themselves the only one of “their kind” in a small community and we aim to counter this isolation by bringing them into our music fold.

Contact Irene Labbett: jigarrejammers@bigpond.com to receive the monthly email newsletter, or for more information about Jigarre Jammin.’