Tag Archives: every dollar

Stand up for justice with ‘Every Dollar’, a fair trade song.

It takes just over four days for a CEO from the top five companies in the garment sector to earn what an ordinary Bangladeshi woman garment worker earns in her whole lifetime. Source: Oxfam International

When faced with a bargain, it’s tempting to overlook the uncomfortable question of who’s actually picking up the tab if we’re not paying a fair price for what goes into our bag.  Employees at garment factories work six days a week, often for less than USD$1 per hour. Workers are under pressure to meet daily targets and work long days with barely any breaks and their health and safety is not considered a priority by their employers.

In a bid to increase awareness of this exploitation and to address the inherent power we hold as consumers, community singing leaders and musicians, Jessie Vintila, and Emma Royle, wrote a song called ‘Every Dollar’.

The goal of the song is for singers and audience to actually change the way they are shopping, and to be inspired to notice their power and to use that power for good.

In the words of Jessie, “it’s about going ‘wow every time I spend a dollar, I’m communicating something, I’m either communicating, ‘yay’ I want that business to succeed, or I really don’t want that business to succeed… We go along being complicit and supportive of a whole lot of things that, if we stopped to think about, we’d find morally reprehensible.”

Jessie’s community choir, ‘Raise the Roof’ sang Every Dollar at Mullumbimby Music Festival in 2016. Throughout the course of rehearsing and performing the song, many of the singers told Jessie how their experience of learning and singing the words was actually changing the way they shopped and many were switching to fair trade options, where they could.

This is precisely the outcome Jessie and Emma had hoped would happen each time the song is taught, learned, sung and heard. While progress in the bigger picture can feel slow, Every Dollar is a reminder about taking small steps in the right direction and doing what we can as a community to support the liberty and rights of workers in the clothing industry and beyond, whenever we can. The recent announcement by Kmart, Cotton On and Target to ‘strengthen their commitment to a living wage for their clothes makers in response to the Oxfam initiative, ‘What she makes’ is testimony to the effectiveness of this approach. These outcomes are in direct response to action and pressure from shoppers who have had enough of the injustice.

Jessie applauds consumer activism of this nature: “What I love about consumer power is that you don’t have to be fighting; you don’t have to be campaigning, you don’t actually have to be doing anything other than making conscious choices when spending your money. And you know you’re doing something really powerful but it doesn’t give you the burn out feeling that other forms of activism can do over time. It’s completely sustainable at a personal level.”

Jessie and Emma were thorough in their research for the song and the verses about Ranya the seamstress and Abdul the cotton picker from India are both based on real stories and statistics.

Activism runs in Jessie’s blood. She grew up in an environment where accountability and sound ethics were highly valued. “I remember as a child, a friend of my parents’ being all excited about finding a woman down the road in a suburb of Perth who worked in a Vietnamese clothing place and could make t-shirts. At the time I didn’t get why she was so excited about what I thought were these really boring T-shirts!”

Jessie’s now adamant about sourcing fair trade clothing herself and has t shirts for her Raise the Roof choirs and her Sing the Camino* tours made by fair trade manufacturers. This anecdote about T-shirts is a lovely testimony to the outcome of conduct and influence. The repercussions of the choices we make and the effect of the songs we sing ripple out into the world in ways we can never know.  So, in the words penned by Jessie and Emma, lets ‘Stand up for justice, Turn every dollar to good’. (Full song below)

Every Dollar                      Lyrics: Emma Royle & Jessie Vintila
Music from Rarely Herd’s version of Mary Don’t You Weep (Spiritual)

Chorus

Every dollar sends a message
Every dollar plays a hand
For somebody somewhere
Think of the people and the land
Oh, well singin’, if I could
You know that I should, I surely should
Stand up for justice, stand up for justice
Turn every dollar to good

Well Ranya was a seamstress
In a Dhaka factory
Worked fifteen hours seven days of the week
Can’t feed her family

Well Abdul picked the cotton
In the fields of Gujarat
Eight years old, twelve hours a day
Forced out of school to work

Well Wendy clothes her family
From her favourite shops in town
Pays the money never stopping to think
How they keep their prices down

Every dollar sends a message
Every dollar plays a hand
For somebody somewhere
Think of the people and the land
Oh, well singin’, if I could
You know that I should, I surely should
Stand up for justice, stand up for justice
Turn every dollar to good

References:
https://whatshemakes.oxfam.org.au/
https://www.vox.com/2018/2/27/17016704/living-wage-clothing-factories
https://www.oxfam.org/en/even-it/one-pair-shoes-we-make-valued-more-our-whole-months-salary

By Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria, with Jessie Vintila. Thank you, Jessie! 

*You can ‘Sing the Camino’ with Jessie Vintila in Brunswick on Saturday, 23 March: 2-5pm! (Hosted by the Brunswick Rogues Choir). Info and bookings: https://www.singthecamino.com/singing-workshops.html

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