Tag Archives: choir

An adventure with the opera

by Margaret Crichton

On a chilly June evening, a group of my community choir members from Ivanhoe, Epping and Mernda, and I gathered outside Horti Hall, the home of the Victorian Opera, waiting with interest (and some with trepidation!) to see what we were confronted with when the doors opened. Members of other choirs from around Melbourne wandered up to join us and we were invited inside.

Nothing too scary confronted us at first; just a hundred or so chairs set up in rows near a piano and a music stand. Then, at 7.30, our conductor and the accompanist arrived, and after a few preliminary remarks it all started!

Well, really it all started with an email from the Victorian Opera asking for choirs to take part in the chorus of a new production – Remembrance – which tells the story of World War 1 using songs from the era and a few specially composed pieces. It is narrated by the War Correspondent, played by the wonderful David Hobson, with solos and group pieces by young singers from the Victorian Opera. Photographs from the time were projected at the back of the stage – along with the words of a few of the bawdier songs! All the words were authentic.

ITHE CHORUSMost of my singers have little or no music reading ability. The next couple of hours of intense rehearsal were a little daunting for them as they felt surrounded by people who could sight-read the music or who had studied it intensely before arriving.

But as I pointed out to them, community choir members have a great advantage – they watch the conductor and listen to the instructions and the music!

And with the help of the practice CDs I obtained for them, everyone learned their parts. The fact that there were some tunes and words which were familiar to most of them also helped!

We had three rehearsals at Horti Hall. Just 6 hours to learn 4 part harmony with a couple of quite tricky arrangements thrown in. It was wonderful to see how well the pieces came together. Our conductor was very clear in his ideas, not surprising when we learned he was the composer.

August arrived and we knew the performance was close. Firstly there was the dress rehearsal with full orchestra on stage at Hamer Hall. Twenty singers from the Tasmanian Symphony joined our merry throng. It was the first time we had sung the work in its entirety and there were a few little surprises. (Keeping track of which parts were being sung and by who, in each production could not have been easy.) Not all of the singers could make it to this rehearsal, which was held the evening before the performance, so we knew the numbers were a little down. That didn’t affect the enthusiasm or the volume though.

Then home, with the music running through our heads, to recharge for the next day, which was full on!  I arrived at Hamer Hall at 1.30 and the singers just kept on coming! The production was travelling on to regional areas and some of the singers from those areas took the opportunity to come along for an extra performance.

There were singers from Gippsland, Strathbogie, Bendigo and other areas. In total, 130 singers were in the chorus, and for many of them it was their first experience singing with such a big group and in such a wonderful venue.

There was a stage rehearsal, a break, a seating call, last minute instructions,  and then – the theatre doors opened and the audience began arriving.

All too soon the performance was over. Those of us from Melbourne envied the singers who were getting to perform again in the regions. One night just wasn’t enough! Our audience groupies gave us lots of positive feedback. (Even those who weren’t opera buffs and were dragged along to cheer us on!) And I wanted to be in two places at once, singing and watching.

 The feedback from my singers was all along the lines of when can we do this again!

So, if the chance comes your way, don’t be daunted, grab it and go. Take the plunge, do your best, watch and learn, and as I reminded my lot, have fun!!!

Singing to the end. How a group who sing for people in palliative care, came to be

One of the few things of which we can be certain is that one day, we’ll die. For many of us, this is something we avoid thinking about, preferring to concentrate instead on getting through each day in as positive and as present a way as possible. But imagine how our anticipation of this final journey might change if we could choose to be sung to, as we passed out of this life.

This is the mission of Ilana Sharp. Ilana leads Sonder, a women’s singing group that has been meeting monthly since March at McCulloch House, a palliative care centre that’s part of Monash Health in Melbourne, to sing for people who are reaching the end of their life.

Singing acapella in three and occasionally four-part harmony and for up to forty minutes each time, this group of eleven women are bound by their desire to deliver an uplifting sense of joy into an emotionally complex environment. Unsurprisingly, Ilana finds it’s an amazing thing to do.

“..it’s the intimacy and privilege of being able to offer something so gentle, open and comforting as singing, at the end of someone’s life.”

Sonder sing for the benefit of everyone in the hospice. For the patients, the staff, for themselves and for the family members of those people who are dying. Ilana says this isn’t without challenge and that life continues around them from their central point in the lounge area between the two wards. “Phones ring, sometimes the TV’s on….” But the staff assure them that the sound of their singing transcends this, travelling down along the corridors and filling all the rooms.

“The sound is uncomplicated, an offering to counteract the physicality of pain, suffering and concern, it offers an external focus… it takes you outside of yourself… there’s something in that for everyone. It also normalises the environment a little bit.”

The seed for Sonder was sown a few years ago by a short article Ilana read in the weekend Age newspaper about a Sydney based singing group who were doing a similar thing. She was taken by the idea and did some research into the existence of similar groups in Melbourne, but found nothing. Later, when her own mother was dying, Ilana was inspired to sing a Buddhist Mantra to her as she passed… “I’m not Buddhist, although I have a long standing interest, and I hadn’t sung for years but I had a strong urge to sing this mantra, over and over.”

Then about a year ago, the regular community choir to which all of the Sonder singers also belong, was having a night off. Keen to get their regular singing fix, some of the women met in the lounge room at somebody’s house. Used to singing together as part of a much larger group, the sound that evening was amazing; intense and enveloping, and the idea of singing as therapy for the dying recurred to Ilana.  She put the idea out there, expecting for only one or two people to be interested but, to her amazement, the women agreed unanimously and Sonder was born.

It was never Ilana’s intention to start a singing group of her own, and the emergence and sustainability of leading a group under any conditions, is rarely without challenge.

At first, Ilana felt a fraud. The dynamics were messy, things felt disjointed within the group even though they were united by a common aim as everyone struggled to work out a structure. Recognising the need for someone to take a stand and emerge as a clear leader, and with support from within the singing circle, Ilana found the courage to seize the reins and offer direction, something she has continued to do, taking cues on instruction where she can and attending leadership skill days. She’s surprised to find how much of what is required is already in her.

Sourcing material is a collective process with everyone suggesting and contributing songs. The women then work out harmonies and commit to meeting and practicing two or three times a month. This in itself is a challenge because of the pressures of life, such as work and kids and other bumps in the road.

McCulloch House is an intense and busy working environment to enter into, and the group is happy to enter quietly, sing, and leave again, as unobtrusively as possible. “We really don’t interact much with staff other than them listening to us and being glad we’re there, and we are warmly supported by their music therapist and nurse unit manager.”

This aim of their singing is not to make the world stop and listen, but to deliver a sense of warmth and light, and the women in Sonder find that they get out as much out of doing it, as the people on the receiving end of their singing.

“It’s incredibly joyous and uplifting and there’s a real sense of … family, I think, between us…”

‘Sonder’ is taken from the Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows and is defined as ‘the realization that each random passer-by is living a life as vivid and complex as your own—populated with their own ambitions, friends, routines, worries and inherited craziness—an epic story that continues invisibly around you like an anthill sprawling deep underground, with elaborate passageways to thousands of other lives that you’ll never know existed, in which you might appear only once, as an extra sipping coffee in the background, as a blur of traffic passing on the highway, as a lighted window at dusk.’

This summarises the mission of the singing group perfectly. Singing to contribute a sense of normalcy and peace to the fabric of an emotionally charged environment and at the crossing points of the lives of many people, in as unobtrusive way as possible. To be the light in the window.

If you know of the Sydney based singing group from which Ilana’s inspiration came, or of the existence of other Victoria based groups doing a similar thing to Sonder, do get in touch. Ilana would love to hear from you, and so would we.

Deb Carveth with Ilana Sharp

Ideas for Community Music Group Leaders, from Belinda McArdle

150812singingldrshipSeveral community music makers and group leaders gathered at Commonground for peer exchange last weekend. I arrived late and left early and am in no position to summarise the weekend but I write to contribute to the network the ideas that captured my attention while there, in the hope they may be useful to others.

Having facilitated many CMVic weekends over the last ten years it was refreshing to be a participant and to be so warmly welcomed, encouraged, supported, inspired, challenged and heard.

It was wonderful to step away from my own busy life to engage in the wider discussion of values and music making even if only for 5 hours. I left with soup in my being, songs recorded on my phone, a copy of Jane Coker’s fabulous new resource ‘Just Sing’, some plans to song swap on line, fabulous group exercises and warm ups and some hearty food for thought.

The afternoon workshop, mutually devised and well facilitated by Strat and Aaron, challenged us to check in with our values and the notion of inclusivity.

Various exercises drew out philosophical arguments, practical tips and everything in between.

I summarise here what I remember, having handed in my notes to CMVic. The topic was what can we as music making leaders/an organisation keep doing, stop doing and start doing in relation to inclusivity.

include in our leadership our own passion for music making. We may think this is implicit, but all of a sudden notice we have been putting admin before playing, we have been playing it safe in our leadership and not taking risks or simply not playing enough ourselves. So, my ideas and resolutions on this topic are:

  • to ensure I am singing and playing for fun outside of my leadership
  • try some more impro games
  • keep including my own original material as well as a courageous cross section and allow my excitement to grow and be shared

Implicitly and explicitly create a culture of belonging. We value welcoming people to our groups and we discussed the value of every member feeling they are a welcomer and part of the hospitality. We discussed allowing people to opportunity to leave or to feed back when a group isn’t the right vibe for them. We talked about remembering to speak openly about WHY we are welcoming from time to time and we touched on feeling we belong ourselves. So, my take on this for my own practise is:

  • to continue to welcome newcomers individually and ask them to share with me after how welcome they felt
  • to continue to foster a culture of belonging by asking people to welcome people around them at the start of the session
  • ensure I feel included by sharing with the group that I would prefer not to leave alone in the dark at nights and ask them to share staying back with me.

Of course the discussion was richer and broader but they were my standard tips personally. Other big and little resolutions I took away were:

  • I purchased a copy of Search and Reflect by John Stevens based on the workshop Jane Coker delivered
  • I will be gathering my group at start/after session with either a hum or a clapping exercises
  • I used to ask participants to bring their instrument on last week of term and then run 3 chord song so it was accessible and interesting in a different way. I need to start that again.
  • Go to more CMVic events
  • Use the microphone in Facebook Messenger to send little voice files to other leaders and receive them back.
  • Contribute more to the blog/wider discussion so I can hear what others are doing and be reminded of our very important differences that keep us interesting.

I enjoy sharing what I have and know and think and am open to emails from other leaders and the exchange of ideas, songs and challenges. Conctact: Belinda@acabellas.net.au http://www.acabellas.net.au

Belinda McArdle

Sing a song of skylines: The inspiration .. & the idea…

A still taken from the work of Koshi Kawachi
A still taken from the work ‘note drawing’ by Koshi Kawachi

A recent article in the Huffington Post talked of a project by Japanese artist, Koshi Kawachi. Tracing an outline of the world around him and punctuating the pinnacles and troughs along it with strategic dots, Kawachi transposed what was laid out before him into music, the pitch rising and falling with the undulating level of the marked points. And from this representation of the skyline emerged a very simple yet unique tune: a topographical tune, the outline of an area of Japan mapped musically in a way not too far removed from a songline.

This caught my attention for a multitude of reasons. Our own continent is woven by an invisible network of songlines, after all, which continue to exist extremely effectively as communication and navigational highways and which did so long before google maps tried to conquer cartography and squash the arguably potential romance in ever getting lost. But Kawachi was not trying to communicate anything deeper than a musical translation of the mountains and cityscape of Sapporo, as he saw it laid out before him. And rather than being a song cycle carrying thousands of miles and shared between clans, his was the work of one person, starting and ending there.

More than anything, it was the beauty in the simplicity of Kawachi’s idea which inspired me and got me to thinking… a dangerous thing, late on a Thursday afternoon when there’s nothing in the house for dinner.

From the urban landscapes of our cities and townships to the wilds of the promontories and coastlines; the green rolling hills, mountains and wide open expanses in between, we each occupy very different spaces with which to identify and call home. And dotted across all these regions are singing groups telling stories through song, weaving communities together and creating a network, via which to communicate.

So as Thursday wore on, my imagination became fired until I arrived at the point of suggesting we borrow Kawachi’s idea of mapping in music, the variety and diversity of what our respective regions represent to us, physically and emotionally. The outline of a favourite view, a place of deep personal meaning, or just the familiar, and combining this with the idea of a song carried across the land with each community reached, owning a part of it.

If singing groups spanning the length and bredth of Victoria were to write a simple song with a tune defined by the rise and fall of local chimney pots, lone gums, sharp bends, dense forests, gullies, or whatever affects and appeals to us from the uniqueness of our surroundings and connects us to our little piece of earth, then perhaps we can devise a song cycle of our own.

Shared across the statewide singing community, we could create a cycle stretching from Mallacoota to Mildura, from Wodonga to Warracknabeal and everywhere else around and about, in any old geographical way. Sitting here in a chilly house by myself, I dream of this taking shape and of a massed sing of all our skylines, and it warms my heart.  Would we be able to identify the region from which a song came? How varied would the resulting songs sound? Does this idea, in fact, sound bonkers?  We won’t know until we try, so come on, how about it? Let’s get Victoria singing Victoria!*

*If you feel inspired to take up this idea in your singing group and have time to make it happen, please send us your song, we’d love to hear it! (info@cmvic.org.au) We’ll share any songs we receive on the CMVic blog, and see what unfolds.

Article by Deb Carveth, Online editor for Community Music Victoria

Host a Singing Gathering – it makes you happy!

By Jane Coker

It was really sunny and verging on warm in May when four community choirs gathered in Victoria’s Mirboo North, South Gippsland to sing together.

Sweet Sassafrass and VoKallista from the Dandenong Ranges visited Acoustic Kitchen and GrandRidge 245 (Mirboo North’s Community Choir), repaying a visit we had made to them, in the Dandenong Ranges last year. Friendships between the groups had previously been established via CMVic singers’ gatherings and had spurred us to get together.

We first met in Kallista last year and it was such immense fun that we just had to do it again!

Each choir leader taught a song to the whole group, the choirs all performed a few songs for each other (the most appreciative and receptive audience you could ever have!) and we also sang lots of short easy rounds and part songs.

The Locals provided a magnificent afternoon tea. The venue had a fabulous view of the Strzelecki Ranges and as the glorious sound of people singing together filled the room, we watched the sun go down over the hills. Afterwards some of the Mirboo North choir members, who have only recently started group singing, sent me these words:

“I can honestly say I have never felt so happy”

“The performances by all the choirs were sooooo good.  I enjoyed every minute and the people were all so friendly.  Let’s do it again soon. “

“a wonderful afternoon, we enjoyed it immensely.”

It’s a really easy type of event to organise because you have a guaranteed audience! Here’s how:

  1. Pick which groups you want to invite,
  2. set a date together,
  3. book a venue,
  4. Confirm numbers attending from each group
  5. Organise volunteers to bring afternoon tea, do the door etc
  6. Charge people a nominal entry fee to cover costs (we included a fee for the choir leaders too)
  7. Have a great sing together!

Why not give it a go?

Jane Coker

Why I love Marimbas

Great instruments for community music-making

by Heather McLaughlin

MARIMBA

I have been a keen fan of homemade marimbas since the very first community-built instrument was made in Australia, at a family music conference in Melbourne in 1991. As I now come to the end of my teaching career in schools, I’ve realised that the absolute favourite part of my job in recent years has been getting kids and adults playing marimbas (often along with xylophone and other melodic percussion). I also really enjoy helping people to make marimbas, and a one-day working bee with a group of families can result in an instrument that will last for years. For adults in the community they are a perfect step into playing music in groups. (One of my most satisfying workshop sessions was getting some novice 90 year old men playing marimbas.)

In the early 1990s, Jon Madin and Andy Rigby began what is now an international movement by adapting the marimba-making model Andy had learnt about in Botswana. Ever since then, playing marimbas, encouraging others to play them, and making them with school and community groups has been a big part of my life.

Some of the instruments I have been using in schools recently were made in the early 1990s and are still going strong – with perhaps a few bars replaced over that time, and a bit of re-tuning every few years.

What’s so magical about Marimbas?

  • Lots of things!  They are so big, you can make them yourself, they are made of lovely wood, they can be played by anyone, they always sound good, and you can play with your friends! Someone can play just a two note bass and others can add in other patterns and it will sound good. Or you can play more complicated things like the “Can Can” which is great fun. All levels, all ages.
  • I just love the sound of a room full of marimbas booming away, whether it’s school kids or top-level musicians or a mix of all ages or beginner adults.
  • Anyone can sound good on a marimba within ten minutes.
  • With carefully selected pieces, even a new group of players can sound terrific in fifteen.
  • Marimba playing = Immediate gratification!

In schools    PPSperf2012

As a foundation to a classroom set of xylophones and other percussion, they have now become common in music programmes, especially in the Australian states where music specialists are regular members of staff in primary schools (Victoria, Queensland etc). Ideally they are the Jon Madin design and have been made by parents and children at the same school, for feelings of ownership and empowerment.

Carl Orff, a German composer and music educator, inspired an approach to learning music that encouraged playing  and singing as a group, integrating music and movement or dance, and used instruments that were easy to play.

The set of instruments used in an Orff-inspired music programme is called the ‘instrumentarium’ and usually consists of ‘melodic percussion’ or barred instruments:  xylophones (wooden bars), glockenspiels (the little high-pitched metal ones), and metallophones (larger, lower-pitched metal ones), Percussion instruments such as drums and wood blocks, and recorders, are also part of the ‘Orff Instrumentarium’. Marimbas are an ideal addition to this collection, and are common in primary schools around Victoria. One of the enormous bass marimbas added in gives great ‘oomph’ to the music and is always popular with students.

The Victorian Orff Schulwerk Association (VOSA) runs lots of workshops and other events for teachers and other adults interested in music and/or working with children. Carl Orff also emphasized improvisation, and marimbas and percussion.

Marimbas:90yr oldMarimba

  • sound great, look impressive
  • are really satisfying to build (for $300 or less)
  • are perfect for schools and community music-making
  • improvising is easy, with a visual aspect
  • are good for people with varied musical background
  • can be used for quick group music
  • are a non-threatening introduction to instrumental music
  • are ideal for social interaction.

The large size and physical nature of the marimbas make them appealing, especially to older students and adults, and they give a good bass to the other instruments.

Ideas that work

Many of the musical pieces Jon Madin and others have developed over the last twenty years have a quite simple bass line – often only a few notes – and use similar ideas to those developed by composer and music educator Carl Orff after his interest in African and Indonesian traditional music:

  • repeated patterns or ostinatiHeatherClose-upMarimba
  • segments that are visually and aurally separate
  • sometimes removal of some of the notes to make patterns easier
  • familiar tunes (from the Pachelbel Canon to Hell and Toe)
  • catchy rhythms can emphasise the percussive nature of marimbas
  • a small number of notes
  • avoiding big jumps
  • songs which tell players which letters to use

By combining a simple bass with a middle part which is not too difficult, and perhaps a more complex top part or melody which is fairly quick to learn, groups of novice musicians can be led to group music-making that is immediately satisfying.

Jon Madin’s “Boris the Bassman” has been a great favourite for 20 years because it incorporates these elements.

Community Marimba Playing

There are regular events where you can play marimbas.  Weekends such as Community Music Victoria’s Treetops Music Camp, Turramurra Bush Music Camp, Roses Gap/Charnwood Folk Camp, and the monthly playing sessions in West Heidelberg (HeidyMarimba) all offer opportunities for everyone to try these instruments.

You’ll see them at some festivals. Look out for Jon Madin and his marimbas (plus all those other surprising instruments such as Musical Bikes and DingBoxes). Andy Rigby may be there with some marimbas as well as harps or flutes of various types. The annual Melbourne Wood Show has a stand where you can see an instrument being made, and try them out. In Geelong, and at the Port Fairy Folk Festival, you may see the Tate Street Primary group playing. Maybe your local primary school has a couple.

Marimbas are all around, especially in Victoria – hooray!

Want to know more? Want to play? Want to make one? Contact CMVic or like Marimba Victoria on Facebook

Resources

Jon Madin: Make Your Own Marimbas ; Jon Madin: Marimba Music 1 etc. (Four books/CDs of pieces and songs);

Walt Hampton Hot Marimba

Gerard van der Geer Marimbamania

Andy Rigby Marimba!

Click here for Jon Madin’s website

Video clips:

Joseph Bromley with ukes and marimbas in Wangaratta, Spanish Harlem

Dani Rocca’s session at CMVic Tune Up 2012 – “Banuwa”

Jon Madin’s “Rocking Dogs” – NSW Small Schools Marimba group

2012 Tune Up  session with Heather McLaughlin

Joseph Bromley with Morricone at Treetops:

The joy of song swaps: singing leader Barb McFarlane sings out

Vokallista Community ChoirThe Dandenong hills are alive with the sound of music but there’s no sign of the Von Trapps in any of the tea shops, anyone running is probably just late for Puffing Billy not making a dash for the Swiss border, and for lonely goatherds there are open mic nights and online forums. How times have changed… Much of the music ringing around these green hills is community music, championed and facilitated by, among others, Barb McFarlane, a long time community music activist and valued supporter of Community Music Victoria.

Barb recently dropped us a line in response to a blog post about Song Swaps: “Song Swaps are my favouritest CMVic short activity! I love that you never know what will be presented and I always come away with some new gems, some new ideas and the warm glow of connecting with others who love gathering people to sing.”

Ooh, now who doesn’t love a bit of positive feedback? It spreads happiness and comfort like butter on hot toast. So, getting a little greedy, we pursued Barb shamelessly with questions about her style and approach to singing leadership that she was good enough to answer with further reflection on why she loves Song Swaps so much, as well as offering some insight into her own musical journey, which began at a young age.

“I remember sitting at the piano, striking notes one at a time and putting my ear close to the keys and waiting ’til I couldn’t hear the note ringing before playing the next one. Also making melodies with no end. When I was a bit older, I’d pretend I was Julie Andrews and sing songs from the Sound of Music. I was sure I sounded just like her! Many school holidays visiting with cousins where we’d all sing songs we’d learned at Guides, Sunday school or School remind me of SongSwaps!”

So what was it that made Barb decide to become a Singing Leader? I realised that I didn’t get much pleasure out of performing and was embarrassed by praise. I felt there was something I was missing, a realisation about the thoughts and feelings that audience members had, that seemed to make them think they couldn’t do what I was doing. It bothered me that over the years, people said things that seemed to put performers above themselves. It was like finding gold when I realised that I could help empower people to sing without judgment and with no audience but the circle of other singers.

Barb leads two weekly Sing for Fun groups that are inclusive of people of all abilities, a Strum and Sing Ukulele group and a Community Choir called VoKallista, which she started in 2009 and runs with assistance from Libby Price. Vokallista is an open, performing choir who sing a variety of material that Barb describes as dealing with themes such as social justice “and the fascinating challenges of being human.” She leads sings at many community events and festivals such as The Hills and finds that people really love to celebrate!

VoKallista has been going for a while now; how do you keep it evolving and what do you think is the secret of its success? VoKallista evolved from a caroling group I was leading. We’d all troup around nursing homes and the like in the busy lead-up to Christmas, instead of being swallowed up by the craziness. I think the kind of people we are has led the style and subjects of music and then we’ve attracted more people who like our songs and are similarly community minded, like to live more simply, are very caring of the environment and keen on social justice, peace and equality among human beings. So maybe the ‘secret’ has been that ‘like attracts like’! Having an Assistant Director in Libby Price has been invaluable. I’ve had someone to talk through difficult stuff with, as well as lots of the practical things running a choir calls for.

I credit the circle formation that I’ve learned to work in, with much of the success of the model of Sing for Fun, otherwise known as Vocal Nosh. (I don’t do food!) Without words each participant is saying “you are welcome, you are one of us, you have value as a person, we are all equal, we are on the same team, however you are today is fine, I can see you, I can hear you and let’s create something beautiful together.” CMVic have given this amazing gift to the community by teaching this model to all Singing Leaders who have come to them and taken this back into their communities. Working in a circle is, for me, the most important element to the success of any singing group but so many of the basic singing leadership skills have become my second language as I see how easy they make the learning of a song for people.

CMVic has been Mothership to me and I have developed further skills and confidence to lead a group in song. I receive such wonderful support and encouragement from CMVic to continue to skill share and song share with other leaders and this keeps my practice very fresh and keeps me inspired and energised! CMVic members are like my musical family.

The songs I’ve collected from Song Swaps that I treasure most and use most are the little shorties, such as ‘After the Journey’ by Laura Brearley:

After the journey

“After the journey

there’s always the rest,

time to be quiet and blessed”

What is it about short songs that makes them so effective to teach a group? The thing about these songs is that they are easily passed on….to other Leaders to use and then to groups of people who may be singing for the first time in their adult life or who have not had many opportunities to sing. The song messages are often very nurturing, reassuring and inspiring and, because they are usually repeated many times and because some are rounds, we tend to go away with the songs stuck in our heads. This can sometimes override other less helpful stuff that may be going on in our heads! I love ear worms!

Do you think more people are turning to community music making in greater numbers as a way of reaching out and connecting with one another? Oh Yes!! I love to see the friendships and connections that are made through a regular sing for fun. I love to hear people’s stories and know that they have found a place to be where whatever they sound like is fine, where there is lots of non-verbal communication through laughter and grimaces, little teams clinging together to stay on their part, eye rolling as my ‘secretary’ is once again sacked for a funny typo. I choose songs that will encourage a positive thought or two, funny songs and songs that are beautiful with just two parts so that people may feel that they are the creators.

I reckon that all times have their difficulties but the time we live in now calls for strengthened, tightly woven communities who will be able to pull together when needed.

What do you like to do when you’re not singing and music making? I read a lot. I love a good chat and a walk in the forest. I also get involved in Community events.

Finally, if you were let loose in one of the many tasty cake shops nestled in those hills, which tasty treat would be in the most danger? Lemon Meringue pie!

Barb’s community choir have struck lucky in having her as their leader, something they’re probably highly aware of as they continue to try and determine the human condition and sing to bring awareness, change and enrichment to the lives of themselves and of others. Huge thanks to Barb for playing ball and giving her time and energy to this post. The song ‘After the journey’ is published here, courtesy of Laura Brearley and is taken from the CMVic publication ‘Short Stuff’.

For information about Vokallista, click here or visit their Facebook page www.facebook.com/VoKallista

Interview with Barb McFarlane by Deb Carveth, Online Editor for CMVic

Pollyphonics 6 min documentary – The start of a great musical journey

Give people an opportunity to feel good - Polly Christie, Pollyphonics Choir Leader

Polly has shared this video on our CMVic facebook page and we thought it was a fantastic example of how powerful music can be in connecting with others.  Runs for 6 minutes and offers a great insight into the many benefits of community music from both a leader’s and participant’s perspectives.

Here’s a little of what’s covered.

  • Deciding to become a leader
  • Where to start a group
  • Objectives
  • Fee structure
  • Going from being the conductor, facilitator, coordinator to introducing section leaders
  • Challenges

Here’s what the choir participants had to say

I got my mojo back

When I come here I know that I’ll feel so much better

It’s the start of a great musical journey

This link will take you to the video:  Pollyphonics Choir documentary Sep 2014

Documentary created by Rebecca Fitzgibbon for her music course at Northern Melbourne, Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia.

The Pollyphonics Choir is located in Woodend, Victoria Australia
Website: www.pollychristie.com
Facebook:  facebook.com/PollyphonicsChoir

Article by CMVic Team