Category Archives: StreetSounds

StreetSounds festival hits the streets of Geelong with aplomb!

Sun shone through grey clouds gathered low over Pakington Street in Geelong West last Saturday morning, jostling to catch a glimpse of the gloriously coloured community musicians gathering in readiness on the grass below to play in the StreetSounds Festival parade and fiesta. The previous evening these same musicians had made their way to Geelong to bring the StreetSounds project to Geelong After Dark, illuminating the darkness with beats, riffs, fat sounds, fairy lights and high vis vests.

The StreetSounds project has been lead by Community Music Victoria since 2015, with funding from R E Ross Trust and Helen Macpherson Smith Trust. Over the past two years, street bands have popped up in Kyneton, Bellbrae and Inverloch; Morwell, Dunolly, and Footscray; Sunshine, Windsor and Melton, all kindled and supported with encouragement, advice and input from StreetSounds project manager, Lyndal Chambers.

Each of the bands is open to anyone and experience, skill levels and age are no barrier to joining in. What’s key is the desire to have fun and connect through making music together in a way that is mobile and can be taken out to the streets and delivered to the broader community for everyone to enjoy. Playing loud music and wearing loud clothes present people with an opportunity to escape the mundanities and worries of life once in a while, whilst making new friends and strengthening local networks: what’s not to love?

Many amazing moments have come to light as the StreetSounds project has unfolded. Horns have been dusted down, flutes and recorders have emerged from packing boxes, marimbas have been built and washboards assembled. There are several families now involved across the project: Amy plays in the Fabulous Meltones together with her three kids and her father.  In the Prahran Accordion Band, Hans has dreamed of being able to play the accordion since childhood.  And for everyone, making music in a band where there are no wrong notes adds a dimension to life, hard to beat.

The element of inclusion which has underpinned the StreetSounds project since its inception was evident at the Festival and in this safe space the crowd brimmed with palpable pride, enjoying the energy and enthusiasm generated by merging and becoming part of a bigger picture. A static crackle of excitement sparkled and sparked through the throng and across West Park on Saturday, exploding into a massed rendition of ‘Caderas’ and Shane Howard’s ‘Talk of the Town’, two common tunes learnt and rehearsed by the bands to play together at that very point.

A pop-up off-shoot of the non-conventional street band ‘Our Community Sounds’ ran an open improvisation workshop in the Park’s rotunda, drawing in members from all of the bands and encouraging them to experiment spontaneously with sound. ‘Our Community Sounds’, facilitated on Saturday by Conor O’Hanlon, shares the same philosophy as the other street bands – one of removing barriers to participation in music making but the delivery is in the form of spontaneous participatory events rather than performances.

“I realised what a unique thing we were all doing – not a Jazz Festival, not a Folk Festival, not a Brass Band Festival, not a Music Camp .. something that’s inclusive of a diversity of skill level, instrumentation and cultures.” Lyndal Chambers, StreetSounds project manager

The clouds could only contain their excitement for so long, and as the rain finally fell, the StreetSounds mob and their homemade banners moved into the hall at West Park where they played short sets all afternoon, joined by the Zamponistas, Havana Palava, Doowlla of Drum Connection and Geelong’s Tate Primary School marimba band, the Marimbataters.

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Darth Vader takes to the streets as part of Kyneton Street Band
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Percussionist Steve Schultz & his son drumming up a storm with Invy Horn Jam
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Jane Coker, chair of the CMVic board of management giving cues during the massed play
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Members of Havana Palava meet members of the Sunshine Street Band, Boomulele, & the Fabulous Meltones. Other players from other bands joined in amongst the crowd for a fantastic finale!

Click the  links below to see two glorious photo stories of the event, by Dr Laura Brearley:

1: GEELONG AFTER DARK

2: STREETSOUNDS FESTIVAL

And there are oodles more photos of everyone to see on the StreetSounds Facebook page!

Written by Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria

Further reading:

Our Community Sounds: an exciting new improv project

MELTIN’ DOWN AGE BARRIERS IN MELTON: THE INTERGENERATIONAL STREET BAND SUPPORTING FAMILY MUSIC MAKING.

Dreams Come True at Prahran Accordion Band

**To find out about joining a StreetSounds group near you, contact Community Music Victoria or jump on the website, www.cmvic.org.au

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Meltin’ down age barriers in Melton: The intergenerational street band supporting family music making.

‘What I really get out of the band and the practice is simply the fun.’ says Melton resident Amy McDonald who for the past year has played with The Fabulous Meltones, one of the bands to have emerged with support from Community Music Victoria’s StreetSounds project.

There are three generations of Amy’s family in the band: Amy, her 67 year old father, Martin, and her three kids, Nina, Tenzin and Kohana who range in age from 23-6 years old.

“To have the sort of fun that say, Havana Palava have, would’ve been undreamed of for me before, and even though I’m not there yet, I live in hope!”

The experience of being in The Fabulous Meltones has extended the opportunity Amy and her family has to make music together, and brought unexpected and hidden talents to light.

“My father who has done orchard work most of his life learnt to make feathered headdresses for the Dream Big festival, last year. Local artist Krissy Tee, who is currently specialising in the creation of amazing headdresses came to give us all a lesson. Dad made his in record time and was then able to help everyone else. He’s also getting to grips with the finer points of picking out loud shirts (The Fabulous Meltones signature colours are red, orange, pink and yellow because we are Melton…meltin’ hot..”

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Martin models his meltin’ hot headdress

Since their inception last year, The Fabulous Meltones have wasted no time making their mark on the local music scene. Lead by John Lane, they have performed at the Dream Big Festival as well as the Platypus and Djerriwarhh festivals in Melton. They’ve also played at the Melton train station for the opening of the underpass artwork unveiling; as part of At The Platform and at the end of year wrap-up party for Linking Melton South.

“I love that we get to perform together, we had never done anything like that together before. My dad always played the guitar, and my mum did and my grandfather does. I had trouble learning written music so I just learnt one riff from every person I came across. Mostly we know that when we’re together we’ll try and have a jam of some sort because everyone’s grown up and moved away, and my dad really loves it.”

The fact that four of the band members are family is important to Amy. “There’s such a difference between the styles of music that each generation likes. When you have family songs that everyone loves singing and those songs remind you of good times that you’ve had, this is a plus because they cross the generation gap.”

Amy and her family practice the pieces they’re learning with the band, together at home.

“I hear my little one, she seems to be singing the songs all the time at home but she will never perform… she sits and draws and she won’t join in, but she’s still listening.”

Amy is adamant that there shouldn’t be any division in society based on age and that being part of The Fabulous Meltones offers people the opportunity to mix socially outside of their own age group and that this teaches tolerance, patience and respect.

“Old people shouldn’t be excluded and young people certainly shouldn’t be excluded…Young people think they’re cool and that we don’t understand their music, but all music becomes old and daggy and it’s only a matter of time until it comes back into fashion.”

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Amy and her daughter, two of the Meltones gals

The fact that there are people of all ages involved in The Fabulous Meltones keeps things interesting and encourages people to be aware and thoughtful of the needs of others.

“Everyone has to be patient… there are little kids there and you have to be patient with older people too… while some people learn things quickly, other people need to be shown things a few times. We’re all different… John (Lane)’s really great and has taught a few of the band members to play the ukulele from scratch, which is so valuable.”

It’s recognised that involvement in an intergenerational community band promotes connection, communication and friendship between the participants, and the benefits of this have a positive effect extending beyond the context of the music making,  strengthening  and reinforcing the fabric of the community.

As Amy says of her experience as a Fabulous Meltone, “It makes you satisfied with your life and with being where you are….”

Article by Deb Carveth, online editor for Community Music Victoria and Amy McDonald from The Fabulous Meltones.

**If you’re interested in joining The Fabulous Meltones, the next practice will be on Thursday 2nd March, at 4.30pm. The band is open to everyone (any age, instrument and skill level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dunroamin? Just startin! A hot stepping new street band hits the streets of Dunolly

Picture the scene: a large group of leather clad bikers on a pit stop; add a healthy dose of community musicians into the mix, and what do you get? Broadway, a street through the small, regional town of Dunolly, last Saturday afternoon.

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A scene from Broadway, Dunolly

The latest addition to the CMVic StreetSounds project shook its collective feathers and stepped blinking into the light at 2pm last Saturday as the new and perfectly formed Dunolly Street Band. Emerging from the Ministry of Fun after less than two hours playing together, the fledgling band wasted no time in taking their newly learnt tunes into the street, where the bikers proved an enthusiastic audience for the horns, ukes, flute and accordion players.

Anna and Phil Ashton who organised the afternoon in collaboration with StreetSounds project manager, Lyndal Chambers, declared it it loads of fun and a total success.

“It was nicely low key and I don’t think anybody was scared!”

Anna was inspired to start a Street band in Dunolly after hearing about the opportunities offered by other bands emerging from the project, particularly the Kyneton Street Band, led by Andy Rigby, but still more than an hour’s drive from Dunolly. For Anna and Phil,

“It didn’t make sense to be part of a street band anywhere else.”

The last community brass band in the town finished up about fifteen years ago. A Ukulele group formed a couple of months ago, but for players of more honky and stronger sounding instruments, an opportunity to gather regularly has been a long time coming. Once she knew support from Lyndal Chambers and Community Music Victoria’s StreetSounds* project would support her vision of a Street Band for Dunolly, Anna felt the idea was too good to pass up and set the wheels in motion, posting publicity within the community and on Facebook. A street band is a fantastic way to bring together local people from all age groups and backgrounds, playing different types of instruments in different ways; a wonderful smorgasbord of sounds and skills.

As the promotional poster for Dunolly Street Band promised, ‘absolutely no experience needed, just come and play for fun.’

Anna admits she felt a bit nervous about numbers ahead of the gathering on Saturday. Strat (Brian Strating) and Lyndal were travelling up from Gippsland to help facilitate and Anna wanted them to have a good ole group to lead when they arrived. She needn’t have worried. Keen community musos travelled from the other side of Newstead and Bendigo to join local Dunollians, including a musician fairly new to the area which is what it’s all about, after all.  Anna knows other people are out there and keen for the band to happen, who simply couldn’t make it along last Saturday.

Following this hugely successful inaugural get together, there are plans to carry the band forwards into a bright (and brassy) future, and working together with Phil’s uke group. Anna is also hoping to encourage local school kids and their families to try it, too.

By the time the StreetSounds festival rolls around next May, it sounds like there will be a thriving Dunolly contingent out in the throng on the streets of Geelong.

And what happened to the bikers? They gave the new Dunolly Street Band an encouraging round of applause before heading off through the Central Goldfields, chasing the dissipating, freed-up notes of newly learnt tunes as they dispersed into the atmosphere.

Below is a video clip of the band in action, out on Broadway. (Thanks to band member Judy Meldrum for the footage)

Article by Deb Carveth with Anna Ashton

Join the Dunolly Street Band! The band is in the process of arranging its next rehearsal. To be a part of it, contact Anna and Phil: 0490 077 902

*StreetSounds is a major project that resulted from the Victoria Makes Music Program and started in January 2015 with the help of funding from the Helen Macpherson Smith Trust and the R E Ross Trust.  The project aims to create at least 10 new street bands in Victoria and will run until Dec 2017 – find out more about StreetSounds here.

 

 

Where StreetSounds Meets Sounds of Country

Dr Laura Brearley

Last week, members of Boomulele, the StreetSounds Street Band from Morwell, took part in a Ceremony at the Latrobe Regional Arts Gallery to mark the end of the Sounds of Country exhibition and to celebrate the community of Aboriginal artists within it. The Sounds of Country exhibition explored the Aboriginal concept of Deep Listening, revealing the relationship the Aboriginal artists have to the land and to the natural world.

The Sounds of Country Ceremony was conducted as a Deep Listening Circle. About 45 people participated in the event which included local Aboriginal artists, community members, guests from the Wulgunggo Ngalu Learning Place, the Torch Project and staff from local organisations and educational institutions. The oldest participant was 89 and the youngest was 10.

It was the first time the Boomulele Ukulele and Percussion Group had played in public and they did a marvellous job, performing strongly and including everyone. Boomulele is one of ten Street Bands within the Community Music Victoria’s StreetSounds project, each of which is making a unique contribution to cultural community development within its region.

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Mick Harding ‘Taungwurrung Goork-Ngada Biik Blood Country, 2016 with Lisa Kennedy and Laura Brearley’s ‘Magic Dilly Bag Circle’, 2016

Before the Ceremony, Lyndal Chambers and Brian (Strat) Strating led a rehearsal with Boomulele and other community members, creating a sense of fun and inclusivity. Ronald Edwards, a Traditional Custodian then welcomed people to his Country and Boomulele led everyone in a Gunaikurnai Acknowledgment Song. During the Ceremony, artists and community members shared stories about their creative practice and a dancer from Wulgunggo Ngalu spontaneously performed a Creation Dance around Ronald Edwards’ painting which lay in the centre of the Circle. At the end of the Ceremony, Boomulele performed ‘Djapana (Sunset Dreaming)’ and it raised the roof.

One of the participants in the Circle was Jeannie Haughton, a local playwright. This is how she described her experience of being part of the Sounds of Country Ceremony:

I feel

the embrace

of a safe place

it wraps me in welcome

I listen

heartfelt words

and pictures leave

traces and tracks in the air

breathe deeply

a long slow outbreath

letting go of everything

but the now

stories

the unspoken

reading wisdom in the lines

on faces

voices from the strong

the fragile cradled

all joining in song, and dance

connecting as one

The combination of music, dance, art and the exchange of stories at the Sounds of Country ceremony led to a strong feeling of community and connection in the room. It was a living example of Deep Listening, a way of listening which goes well beyond what we can hear with our ears. To listen deeply, we need to take time to engage and to create space in which genuine contact can be made.

Boomulele and the SteeetSounds project are making a significant contribution to creating spaces like these across the State.

Feature image: Ronald Edwards: Telling stories on Gunai Country, (detail)2016 acrylic on canvas 

For more information about the StreetSounds project, go to https://cmvic.org.au/pages/streetsounds

 

Basking in the freewheelin’ warmth of the Sunshine Street Band

The last rays of a Tuesday evening sun can often be glimpsed glinting off the brass horns,  drums and other instruments of the Sunshine Street Band by the runners and dog walkers soaking up day’s end on Albion’s oval.

Every second week, the band throw open the doors of Albion Community House to allow strains of ska, jazz, whatever they’re currently playing to escape into the evening air and across this little patch of Melbourne’s West.

Peter Hinton, band founder and self professed freewheeling trombone player, sees the Sunshine Band as a ‘perfect gateway into playing in a group where different instruments are represented.’ Players of any acoustic instrument are welcome, with age and a lack of experience no barriers to joining. Some people follow dots, others play by ear.

As one of the inaugural bands in the StreetSounds project run by Community Music Victoria, the Sunshine Street Band is a real collective and has evolved to run as a collaborative model after a large dose of input, encouragement and mentoring in the early stages, from Lyndal Chambers, guest tutor Robert Jackson, Brian Strating and Katie Rose Fowler, who still plays with the band.

Peter considers the band an effective way to combat social isolation and improve connectedness between like minded people living in and around Sunshine: ‘It’s a very healthy thing to have a connection with your community..’

Hinton was the catalyst in getting the band started because he was keen to find somewhere for himself and his family – specifically his teenage daughter, to play music together with others and because there was ‘genuinely nothing else like that around where you could play music for the joy of it, where auditions and an expected level of experience didn’t apply..’

With some musical experience playing guitar with friends who then moved across town, Peter was keen for himself and his daughter to have the freedom to try new instruments and keep music going as an ‘outside of school type of thing’.  After a spot of googling, and deciding that a local community band open to beginners would be the most rewarding thing to be part of, Peter discovered Community Music Victoria and picked up the phone.

His timing was perfect. Funding for StreetSounds had just been granted by the Helen MacPherson Smith Trust and the RE Ross Trust, and Lyndal Chambers was in place as project manager. Peter’s passion and palpable conviction of the need for a community band in Sunshine were the perfect sparks to ignite the project, and the Sunshine Street band, and the project, were launched.

 ‘Without Lyndal, this wouldn’t have started… she had all the contacts… Together with Strat she helped set the culture in the first couple of sessions .. they made it clear that you don’t have to be professional to be in a band, there were no wrong notes! It was all motivation and encouragement. And she found us the room too. (thanks to Brimbank Council).’

The band is evolving into a real collective in the way they choose what to play and the way they play it. ‘Katie knows which instruments play in which key which has really helped cos you need somebody like that… and we’ve found there are heaps of good reasons for all sharing the leader role, everyone has a say and when they have a say they feel more involved and connected. It also feels more sustainable and means that all the pressure isn’t just on one person.’

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Sunshine Street Band skills being put into practice at CMVic’s 2015 Music Camp

As the numbers increase, Peter says people are being drawn to the community vibe of the band. ‘There are some strong players coming in now from Sunshine West way, and you can tell from the way they play they like their music.’

As a band open to players of all abilities and musical tastes, Peter believes the key to participants getting the most enjoyment out of belonging to the Sunshine Street Band is to be open to trying different styles of music, be supportive of each other and ‘don’t expect too much, too fast… you have to make the commitment.’

From a personal perspective, Peter says that ‘being in the band and playing a brass instrument has opened up a new world for me… I’ve never done something like this before… It’s loosened up some inhibitions in me, you can feel constrained trying to play by the book and I was feeling musically detached, playing a bit of guitar but not socially, so being in the band is really important.’

The door to the Albion Community Centre is open for the duration of the band’s rehearsals every second Tuesday, and newcomers from absolute beginners to experienced players are always welcome: Drop in and try it out!

The Sunshine Street Band: Meets fortnightly at Albion Community House, 61a Selwyn St, Albion, VIC 3020 For dates and further information, go to www.cmvic.org.au

Article by Deb Carveth with Peter Hinton; feature photograph courtesy of Angela Casella

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dreams come true at Prahran Accordion Band!

Prahran Accordion Band’s home is the German Club Tivoli on Dandenong Road. It’s not a building to evoke architectural wonder as you pass, but inside on the first and third Thursdays of the month, magic happens.

From around 6.45pm, members of the Prahran Accordion Band (PAB) can be spotted lugging cases out of cars, setting up music stands and testing their bellows in eager anticipation of another fortnightly session, led by Phil Carroll.

PAB is not huge in numbers which means a real sense of connection is being nurtured and as word gets out, the ranks are growing steadily. There’s now an average of ten players on any given week from across a wide area of Melbourne, battling evening traffic and catching trains in their dedication to squeeze in the time and to get to grips with their accordions.

We are a mixed bunch. Our lineage extends out of that big rehearsal room into the streets of Windsor and from there, all over the globe. To Poland, South America, Germany, Italy and the UK. Our ability varies a lot too; some people, like Hans Gruneberg, are absolute beginners while others have been playing since childhood.

Hans moved from Germany to Australia at the age of 22. Raised in West Berlin, he made the passage by sea away from his family and his home. On arrival at Port Melbourne he was put into quarantine where he was forced to shower seven times a day and have all his belongings sprayed with disinfectant. Undeterred, he has made Australia his home for the past 43 years. Speaking English as his second language, Hans found work as a butcher, married an Australian woman and raised a family of his own.

Hans speaks nostalgically of hearing the accordion played in his German family home especially at Christmas time and about how, as a child, it was a dream of his own to learn to play.

At the age of 65, thanks to the launch of the PAB as part of CMVic’s StreetSounds project, Hans was finally able to tick this wish off his bucket list.  Having never played an instrument before, Hans was encouraged to join by Paul Smyth, founding member of the band, and Judy Gunson who occasionally leads the group.

Hans describes being able to play the accordion as a ‘dream come true’.

“It’s a great feeling to make music… it’s a great group, a friendly group.  I enjoy taking part and it gets me out…  it’s very supportive… and now I can play tunes by myself.”

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Hans in action on his accordion at the StreetSounds Rough Riffs workshop held in July , 2015

The first thirty minutes of each session, is all about going slow for the beginners and that’s the time to ask questions and focus on tunes covering a range of no more than five notes in the right hand, and two chords or less, with the left.

Even then, it can feel surprisingly hard to correlate the two, and evokes the same looks of confusion and concentration as you see on the face of a child trying to simultaneously pat their head and rub their tum. But with just ten minutes practice every day or so, it’s amazing how quickly skills can noticeably improve.

The more extended part of the PAB repertoire includes classics such as La Paloma, and Roll out the Barrel. If you can’t play a piece with both hands, stick with one, join in when and where you can. In this way, we’re making great progress, and learning major and minor scales in the right hand, too.

The sound of a tune divided into alto and soprano parts can be amazing, the harmonies blending; the bits where we stumble and fall flat half way into a tune and have to go over a particular bar several times or start all over again, serve to deepen our connection and commitment to our practice because nobody minds and we all have a laugh.

The chat around the table during our break is also evolving to include more personal issues as people open up to share stories of their backgrounds and their daily lives.

Hans, for example, has overcome an ongoing battle with joint pain and a recent knee replacement makes him the most bionic member of the PAB. He is also a keen documenter of the club’s progress, taking photos of the group in action at Christmas and in concert last year at the Chris Gahan centre, which he then prints out and shares around. Old school, and precious. Hans is also a regular at the club’s shooting range and is a bit of a champion shot. As Phil says, Accordion Players, beware!

The Prahran Accordion Band meets every fortnight for two hours from 7-9pm. An annual subscription of $40 is paid by each player to Club Tivoli for the rehearsal space, which, as Phil points out, is probably cheaper than a one to one accordion lesson, so we’re onto a pretty great thing and there’s a weekly cost of $10. So if you or anyone else you know is using their cased accordion as a coffee table , get them to come down and see what it’s all about.

Prahran Accordion Band is open to players of all age, skill level and ability and is supported by Community Music Victoria through the StreetSounds project. For further information, email the team at Community Music Victoria

Article by Deb Carveth with Hans Gruneberg